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GA0911492

Faux Bois Seat by W Tickle And Son

  • H: 124 cm (48 13/16")
  • W: 102 cm (40 3/16")
  • D: 71 cm (27 15/16")

Large scale, treacle glazed, fired terracotta faux bois armchair by W Tickle and Son, Maryport Cumbria.

Faux bois refers to the tradition of creating furniture from iron, cement and stone with the appearance of wood. Faux bois translates as 'false wood' in French. 

With the Prince of Wales feathers depicted to the centre of the back: three ostrich feathers emerging from a gold coronet.

On the ribbon below you can see the remains of the words 'Ich Dien,' meaning 'to serve' and large initials underneath that: AA.

Considering the scale of this chair and the royal heraldic badge of the plume of the feathers, some connection to the Prince of Wales is possible. It may even have been made for the Prince, who at this point would have been Prince Edward, later to become Edward VII. The chair may have commemorated the marriage of Edward VII to Princess Alexandra of Denmark in 1863. Unfortunately, no firm provenance means this is only speculation.

The Tickle family were involved in many aspects of industry in and around Maryport. In 1871 George Mason Tickle is listed in the census as living at Crosscanonby as a fireclay manufacturer. His father William Tickle was a colliery agent. In 1881 he is recorded as a commission agent and share broker, whilst his 76 year old father is shown as a retired fire brick manufacturer.

The most likely location for the Tickle fire brickworks is Birkby Brickworks just south of Crosscanonby.

This piece is English, circa 1860.

£2,250.00
Lorfords approved

Large scale, treacle glazed, fired terracotta faux bois armchair by W Tickle and Son, Maryport Cumbria.

Faux bois refers to the tradition of creating furniture from iron, cement and stone with the appearance of wood. Faux bois translates as 'false wood' in French. 

With the Prince of Wales feathers depicted to the centre of the back: three ostrich feathers emerging from a gold coronet.

On the ribbon below you can see the remains of the words 'Ich Dien,' meaning 'to serve' and large initials underneath that: AA.

Considering the scale of this chair and the royal heraldic badge of the plume of the feathers, some connection to the Prince of Wales is possible. It may even have been made for the Prince, who at this point would have been Prince Edward, later to become Edward VII. The chair may have commemorated the marriage of Edward VII to Princess Alexandra of Denmark in 1863. Unfortunately, no firm provenance means this is only speculation.

The Tickle family were involved in many aspects of industry in and around Maryport. In 1871 George Mason Tickle is listed in the census as living at Crosscanonby as a fireclay manufacturer. His father William Tickle was a colliery agent. In 1881 he is recorded as a commission agent and share broker, whilst his 76 year old father is shown as a retired fire brick manufacturer.

The most likely location for the Tickle fire brickworks is Birkby Brickworks just south of Crosscanonby.

This piece is English, circa 1860.

  • Condition: Good
  • Country: England
  • Materials & Techniques: Stoneware, Terracotta
  • Style: Victorian
  • Period: 19th Cent

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Returned stock must be delivered to our warehouse within 14 days, in the same condition it left us. The cost to return will be equal to the original delivery cost and will be deducted from your refund. We do not refund the original delivery cost.

We are unable to offer refunds, unless faulty, for any made to order items in our Created range.

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